Terrorist Spotted In NYC Making Mac-n-Cheese/Mayo/Corn Pizza

I’m certain that every second of this video shows crimes against humanity. The most enlightening comment on the video is also the scariest. Watch first then scroll down for that gem of a quote.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“if you check the restaurants twitter, the ingredients are macaroni and cheese, mayonnaise, canned corn, and a pinch of olives. They also have a dessert pizza that has chocolate sauce, gum drops, and twizzlers. I honestly think Seal Team 6 killed the wrong dude… they need to come back and wack this pizza chef for his crimes against humanity.”

 

Humanity indeed.

ExactShooting.com Custom Sizing Die – Experiment #1 Results

So we have initial results. I’d like to thank you all for the views on my video.

We will be testing this die set more over the next year. This is out of my pocket and out of my own curiosity. I have the credit card bills and had the arguments with my wife to show for it. I must caution, because of some things people seem to have in their heads, that this isn’t ever going to make a 1″ gun into a .5″ gun. Anyone suggesting such a thing is either a fool or a liar. What you should be expecting is to reduce variability in your ammo which reduces things like flyers & SD’s. Effects on group size, maybe small ones should be expected as a normal effect of better consistency but because barrel harmonics are involved there so heavily it’s best to keep your hopes in check and out of the land of silliness.

I set up a partially blinded experiment with unfired, 2x fired and >5x fired cases. We (Coach and I) sized up 50rds of each from my Exact die and 50 of each from Coach’s Redding die and tested that in Coach’s rifle. Coach’s rifle has somewhere over 1900rds down the pipe now which is a concern as you’ll see soon. We set the ammo up identically in everything from components to neck tension. We ran 10 shot groups which were composed of 2 non-consecutive 5-shot groups fired at the same aim point. Coach loaded, packed and labelled the ammo boxes (labels are “1” and “2”) and didn’t tell me till after the shooting was done which was which. I pulled the rounds from the boxes, logged data and called the target to engage while coach did the shooting. That way neither of us knew during shooting which ammo was being fired at any given time. That was the best way I could think of for me to pull out experimenter induced bias with a research team of 2.

The result of the first accuracy test was null. That is to say that the numbers difference in average group size was not outside the level of statistical noise. The exception was with brand new brass. It always shot more consistently than reloaded brass and so I removed those results from the full data set due to the noise they introduced. We also weren’t meant to be testing new brass as that would not apply anyway but I wanted that data for another experiment I’ve been running. This is all precisely what was expected. I expected no big result (but certainly hoped for one) in accuracy simply by going to full length resizing and having extremely consistent neck tension and headspace.

Because the result is null though, we’ll re-run the experiment on that rifle just before we replace the barrel, just to verify the results reproduce reliably. We also did some velocity testing as part of that and there was no statistical change in average velocities or SD’s except that in the new brass loads but it was more consistent set to set. Why pull the barrel? The rifle used for that run of the experiment now has ~1900 rounds through it in 6XC with a single load spec (38.5gr H4350, F210M, Norma brass, 115gr HBN coated DTAC). The load is mild; generating only 2800fps, but we know that that barrel is within a few hundred of being pulled on principle; if not actual need, as far as match work goes and it may not be capable of the repeatable accuracy that might show up with the Exact die. So, we’ll try another barrel. A new one. Actually, a new two! So stay tuned, there’s more to come.

In September I purchased 2x new barrels which I got as blanks from the same production run (from Black Hole Weapons). I purchased a new custom reamer in 6XC that produces a chamber that is very tight to the dimensions of the Exact die. Thankfully you can order a reamer with any number of customizations and it’s still the same price as a custom reamer with just 1 custom dimension. Unfortunately it takes weeks for such a reamer to be made. Over the winter I handed the whole works over to a gunsmith friend of mine that also makes ultra-precise gauges as a business. So, he has the equipment and skills to set up barrels that are truly as identical as we could make them and identical enough for a useful experiment to come out of it despite a sample size that’s extremely small.

Anyway, I got both barrels cut, profiled and chambered identically. It was at great cost too. The cost to set each one up was double what I normally pay him to set up a barrel for me for each barrel with over 15 hours of work on each one. These are our new match barrels for the next 2 seasons too. Coach and I will be shooting from the same ammo box so we can share data. Maybe we’ll pick up a few points on same-day wind calls.

We did have a non-null result and from a different direction, which I also predicted. That was that with loads that were sized with my ExactShooting.com die we never had trouble closing the bolt. It was, in fact, always exactly the same effort. On the cases that we sized on the Redding neck die that Coach uses bolt close effort was either not much or a TON. Some post-facto testing later on with coach’s FL die showed the same random bolt close effort. This is obviously due to random headspacing which means that Coach’s FL die probably needs a thou or two buzzed off the bottom. Irrelevant though because we’re testing what’s available out of the box and his FL die out of the box didn’t cut it so I suspect that a lot of FL dies out there may be a little long or short and aren’t sizing things like people think they are.

That is only the results from a well used barrel. We will be running this exact same test using the 2 newly set up barrels. One will be on the same gun (Coach’s match rifle) while its twin which now has just under 400 rounds on it is on a different my “Hot Dog Gun” match rifle. I don’t expect any difference but I could wind up being surprised. The new barrel on Hot Dog Gun is extremely accurate so far, better than Coach’s rifle on its first day. We’ve already developed a load for the new barrel that runs things a bit faster (2980fps) so hopefully with more pressure more differences might start to manifest.

One of the cool things about the ES die is you can pull the body/shoulder portion out and still use the neck sizing portion which itself is easily adjustable for neck tension and neck sizing depth. When you start getting hard bolt close you can dial in .0005″ or .001″ or .0015″ or whatever amount of push-back on the shoulder with an easy click adjustment and know it’ll give that to you exactly. We’ll be running a neck tension accuracy test here real soon. We’ll see if .0005″ increments makes real differences on paper. First though, I’m ordering some brand new brass for that test.

Cost is fairly high for these dies but not unprecedented. That’s true but, beside the point. If you have the money then that’s not an issue anyway. Functionality is THE issue. It’s perfectly functional and makes it super easy to dial in neck tension at .0005″ increments for those really finicky loads, to dial neck sizing depth at .020″ increments and to dial how far back you actually push your shoulders in .0005″ increments. They’ll make one to a reamer print too. How precise are the dies? Well I had my machinist do some gauging to see if they were that precise and he was pretty darned impressed.

For benchrest guys and F-class guys, I think this is really packing the potential to up their game a bit but only because those guys tend toward having done everything else already. BR and F-class are the only places I can think of of offhand where neck tension and headspacing are tightly controlled by the shooters both routinely and with an obsession rarely seen.

Is it going to help joe sixpack? Well no, to be honest. Joe doesn’t know enough to get the potential benefit to begin with. Owners of this die will 100% want to keep their brass sorted by number of firings. They’ll know about what spring back is and why it’s important to them and a lot more. They will be the type that can’t deal with unexpected 5’s instead of 0’s or 1’s in the 4th decimal place of a measurement. The right owner for this die is someone very much like me in the respect that they are prone to setting up narrowly defined experiments and to analyze the statistical data that results before forming opinions. They’re nerds.

For Coach and I the benefit is being able to share ammo and ballistics data in a match, not running out of time anymore on match stages due to bolt cycling problems, not overworking or insufficiently sizing the brass and being able to make subtle adjustments with truly minimal effort as precisely as adjusting a tactical rifle scope.

Bore Scopes – Have or Not Have

Here’s some advice: DO NOT OWN ONE unless you’re a metallurgist. What you see will not make you feel any better. It will confuse and scare you and will ruin the fun you could have shooting. Just because you’re curious is not a good reason to start examining things you simply will not understand. When you need a bore scope, you’ll be taking the gun to a gunsmith who will already have one and he’ll know what he’s looking at.

I answer this question easily once a day and it’s always the same answer, “Don’t bother. Just shoot.” The times when I might have answered differently were answered with, “Dude, your shit is busted. Take it to a gunsmith.”

There. I either saved you $25 or quite a hell of a lot more. You’re welcome.

Outdoor Life Screws the Pooch & Federal Makes Reloader’s Hands Wring

Outdoor Life isn’t known for their shockingly high levels of expertise or their incisive writing. Writing takes time to do right and even more time to do wrong. It’s like carpentry that way. They do have access to industry sources though so if we can wade through all the stuff they got wrong we can find out some cool stuff.

Lead Styphnate

In the article linked below you’ll find TONS of factual errors but, if you look past those you’ll find a few sentences of new information. It appears that no less than the US government and police agencies were responsible for the new lead free primer offering from Federal. Lead styphnate is a pretty dangerous compound to work with but it’s much better as a primer than lead azide or mercury fulminate. Better? Yes. Actually better because it’s a bit less reactive to shock and and friction which means fewer accidents. It’s no worse as all 3 contain extremely toxic heavy metals.

Up till now primers have mostly been focused on simply getting a very hot flame front into a pocket of powder through a small orifice. Well, that’s not entirely accurate. It’s a pretty oversimplified take to be brutally honest. The actual thing that does the lighting off is not a literal flame front. It’s tiny particles that are burning white hot. Those particles collide with gunpowder kernels and well, you can guess what happens next. If you look at the fantastic work done by German Salazar and posted on 6mmbr.com: http://www.6mmbr.com/primerpix.html, you’ll see that Remington primers put out HUGE amounts of white hot particles. Federal 210’s develop a very large very hot flame but not quite so showery in white hot bits. RWS and CCI BR primers show similarly large amounts of white hots compared to say, PMC.

Vigor in the pursuit of improved primers has been super low especially after companies poured piles of money into development of lead free non-toxic primers and ended up with something that was too unreliable for general duty use and which has been relegated to practice ammo. Once bitten equals twice shy so, they never really took the opportunity to improve primers as much as we have bullets and powders and even cartridge case brass alloys. Looking at the pictures from the 6mmbr.com article above, it’s also entirely possible that someone looked and said, “What actually are we improving on?” Looking at the pictures below, I have a hard time thinking it’ll be easy to make them any more functional.

               Federal 210M Primer Flame. Courtesy 6mmbr.com, German Salazar

             Remington no9.5 Primer Flame. Courtesy 6mmbr.com, German Salazar
                               Holy cow! That’s a bunch of flame and sparks.

Possible improvements over current lead styphnate primers:

  • Make them less susceptible to shock or friction and static electrical discharge.
  • Increase the quantity of and mass density of hot particles that are generated.
  • Reduce/eliminate powder/primer reactivity issues
  • Reduce generated gas volume to reduce pressures
  • Increase the time glowing particulate stays hot (increase its specific heat)
  • Make them less susceptible to water contamination
  • Eliminate dependence on Mexico/Brazil/China (especially China) for ingredients

The New Catalyst Primers

New primers use nitrocellulose as fuel instead of PETN. Nitrocellulose is a deflagrant (it burns and super fast). PETN is a high explosive. Lead has been removed. Aluminum is added and we go from barium to bismuth. Barium I’m not sure of the toxicity of but bismuth is touted as non-toxic though research concerning nanoparticles of bismuth oxide to have serious negative health effects at the cellular level. The oxide in the bismuth oxide becomes more free oxygen for the combustion. The heavy bismuth is heated partially by the burning aluminum which is started off by the nitrocellulose. What you have there is a chain of initiation reactions.

Aluminum instead of lead would be rhetorically great but it’s actually the bismuth that’s supplanting the lead. It gets rid of the lead and the aluminum will lengthen the burn cycle and make sure the flames are white hot as long as possible.

 

The Old Lead Styphnate

 

Lead styphnate has more evil in the legend than in the actual use of it in primers. You could eat quite a number of primers without raising your blood lead levels. The real reason I’m betting this went this way was to eliminate the last legitimate civilian reason to possess PETN. Primers don’t contain a lot of it but they do have it and if someone wanted to take a sufficient number of primers and harvest the boom boom butter.

So, let’s chalk up the score. See how Federal did.

Reduce generated gas volume to reduce pressures    ?
Make them less susceptible to shock or friction and static electrical discharge.    ?
Increase the quantity of and mass density of hot particles that are generated. Yes
Reduce/eliminate powder/primer reactivity issues Yes
Increase the time glowing particulate stays hot (increase its specific heat) Yes
Make them less susceptible to water contamination    ?
Eliminate dependence on Mexico/Brazil/China (especially China) for ingredients Yes

I don’t care who you are, that’s a pretty good result for any engineering exercise which seeks to materially improve an existing product.

What we’re seeing in the real world already is handloaders have gone full retard and decided based only on the information that it’s new that they’re not going to use the new primers. We also have others going full retard and predicting that this is some kind of final panacea to fix the marksmanship ailments of lackluster riflemen. Neither is true. If the military is using them then reliability has to be very high. If police are using them then costs have to be pretty low. If Federal Cartridge Company is behind it, I think we can afford to give them the benefit of the doubt.

Finally, not a one of you has much of a choice. Federal is changing all their lines over to this new primer. There will not be 2 lines longer than is necessary to finish converting the 2nd one. Once they make this change you’ve got the existing stock in the market and then you’re going to have to accept that things change. Sure, I have 10,000 primers in my personal back stock too. But I kind of doubt that if you have that many that you shoot little enough to eventually need more.

Get out and shoot!

https://www.outdoorlife.com/cartridge-primer-technology-developments

Are You Shooting Long Range With A Factory Barrel

Lord knows I’m not and rarely would find a reason to do so. That said, factory barrels are turning out some impressive accuracy. How are you approaching your ballistic goals? Factory or aftermarket?

6XC Load Development – Analysis Time

6XC Load Development – Analysis Time


This little case seems to really like being as full as possible and/or run a little hard and put away a little bit wet if you get my meaning. We broke in the barrel with 15 shots but as you can see from the data below, around shot #6 things stabilized. By round 10 I had warmed up the barrel a bit and was vacillating between baking rounds in the chamber while I wiggled around trying to get a natural point of aim and firing quickly when I was already at a good NPoA.

All discussions of load data and charge weights come with the “don’t copy me and hurt yourself” disclaimer. Don’t just run my loads, work up to them. These are all on Norma brass, F210 primers, 115gn DTAC bullets and COAL at 2.8″.

Around shot #6 things pretty well started to stabilize. Inconsistently going between firing quickly and baking rounds in a warm-ish chamber widened the ES a bit around shot 11.

After grinding out the first 15 rounds to break in the bore and establish a zero; this was a BRAND NEW barrel after all, we took a little break and went to check the target. The new barrel shot to such a different POI than the prior barrel that it took quite a few shots just to get on steel at 100yrds. By round 10 we were on steel at what seemed like pretty close to POI=POA. Enough to move to the BoxToBench Precision 100yrd Load Development Target and dialed the zero in on the cold zero aiming point. 5 rounds at the cold zero put us at 15 shots and we were already seeing each set of 2 bullet holes (because: adjust, fire 2, adjust) either touching or very close to it. We’re pretty excited about the performance we’re seeing so far.

After the first 15 shots and letting the gun cool down I settled in to go for groups for record. Starting off we did the Coach’s match load (CML) which is 38.5gn of H4350. Then the RL-23 was run followed by N550 and IMR-4166. To wrap things up we came back to the H4350 and did the 39.5gn load then finished out our paper punching with 5 at 39 grains. After that I had 5 rounds left and wanted to drop a shot on the 900 yard target so we went up there and I rang the gong for 5 rounds of 38.5gn. There’s a called flyer (obvious) on 4 of the 6 aiming points. I wasn’t in the most stable position and I knew it.

 

My velocities are a solid 150fps above what Coach gets from his Enfield rifled barrel of the same length with the same load. Ok, to be completely transparent, it’s not EXACTLY the same load. We do actually seat the bullets about .120 deeper forn my new barrel than Coach’s barrel but I can’t see 150fps difference from that. This is the polygonal rifling in full effect. Less friction because you’re not engraving the bullet, you’re swaging then and then twizzlering them, if only ever so slightly.

So now on to the powder results. H4350 you see the curves change shape as you fill the case up. To my eye it almost looks like someone’s grabbed on to the right side and started pulling the string taut. Group sizes went down as powder charges went up but we’re talking about going from a .75″ group to a .71″ group to a .3″ group. The academic in me is crying out to be let loose with a scale and all of my reloading supplies to do a 1/10th grain at a time experiment. But, that’s expensive and I have other matters to attend to. The experienced rifle shooter in me says, “You do realize that any one of those is sufficient for the 1000yrd stuff you’re doing right?” The competitive rifle shooter in me says, “Take the 39.5 and let’s go home and load ammo before you change your mind again.”

This is Coach’s match load in his current barrel. Featuring a tight 10.87fps standard deviation from my gun and a not disappointing .75″ group this load showed promise. I just don’t want to tune it. In Coach’s gun this load runs 150fps slower, has a 32fps SD and turns in the same .75″ groups.
The group size collapsed on this load down to .4″ until I popped a flyer into it (which I called) that took the final group to .71″. 40fps ES is a bit on the broad side for me out of a 5 shot sample size. I could maybe do half of that. This load does suggest it might want just a little more powder.
When we give it 39.5 grains the dissonant came into harmony and it made a .3″ group with 2fps SD’s and 5fps ES. It’s running mild pressures and making within a gnat’s ass of 3,000 fps where I’d draw the velocity line anyway. 2900-2950 was our target and we’re there with a solid load.

Onward and upward. We still have loads to analyze. Everyone knows that after my experience with it in .243AI and 6.5x55AU that I’m a big fan of Reloader 23. It’s sloooooooow burning and has been returning impressive velocities with reasonable pressures from very heavy for caliber bullets in relatively long bores from very overbore cases… as you would expect it to do if you are at all familiar with Boyle’s Gas Law. We had no idea how much to start with so we did exactly what Coach did with it for my .243AI. We filled the case up to the body:shoulder junction, dumped it out and weighed it and put that much into 5 cases. It came out at 38 grains with no drop tube, just a funnel and a weighing pan.

Reloader 23 showed me with my .243AI that it likes a full case (I’m sensing a trend here with these slow burning magnum powders) and that it’s pretty hard to put enough into a 6mm case based on a .473 case head to blow the damned thing up if you’re seating to SAAMI/CIP lengths. 38 grains produced pretty nice velocity. A testament to the efficiency of the 6XC case setup. Still with 28fps SD’s, 66fps ES and a .68″ group of 5, it would “do” but I’d want to develop it more if I were to use it. We did find that RL-23 is a great option. Somewhere around 40 grains should give high 2900’s at reasonable pressures even when seating bullets deepish.

                                That right there is porn star sloppy.

Pressing on, we have N550. A double base NG/NC powder known for being a little temperature touchy after 90F and for being pretty darned expensive. 36.5 grains of N550 gave us a nice narrow 11.95fps SD’s on ES’s of only 29fps. Still a little tall but velocities were touching 2900 and pressures were VERY low. It also grouped a .2″ group of 5 shots. Oh man am I tempted to increase my powder budget by 25%. We figure we could fill the case on this stuff somewhere around 39 grains at 3,000fps. But, I don’t want to develop a load; much less an expensive one, if one jumps out at me and that H4350 load at 39.5 grains is hard to beat even with stupid tight groups.

             A lot of promise in this one. Super stable velocity potential.

Now we cross into “Coach style load” territory. So far we’ve been on the very slow side of the slow side of the rifle powder spectrum. Now we’re going to cross the street where the Beatles fans turn into Stones fans and start dragging their knuckles. Not really. Just making fun of coach. The defining line between a “Me” style and a “Coach” style of handload is I like my powder to burn all the way down the barrel giving consistent pressure all the way without a huge spike of pressure in the case itself. My way is easier on brass but harder on barrel throats because there’s more grit coming out of the case neck this way. Coach likes his pressure to form in the case, for all the combustion events to happen in that space and then to use the built up pressure. He also tends to jam bullets rather than jump them where I jump them at least a little bit normally.

Making a Coach style recipe means you know you’ll see pressure sooner or later in your experimenting. That being the case and the fact that there was no data for IMR-4166 (which is around Varget/IMR-4895 burn speed) we elected to hot-foot bloody educated guess it. I calculated that 37.5 grains was about the most we’d want to try and so we tried that. It came back hot enough to imprint my ejector hole on the brass so that’s at least 1 full grain too much juice. It did however make 3080fps with a 2fps SD and a 6fps ES for 5 rounds. Drop a grain or two and you’re right up around 2950-3000fps. What a smoker though! Too bad the pressures were simply too high.

      If it wasn’t running north of 70,000psi This would be my new load.

Below you can see the velocities as they came out of the gun during testing.  You can see it took about 5 rounds to season the bore and then it’s pretty much standard load development wavy gravy until you get to 2 very specific sections whose extreme flatness gives away that something very cool happened there and needed to be paid attention to.

So while N550 turned in the best group and ok SD’s, the extremely tight SD’s and the super tight group out of the 39.5gn load of H4350 has won the day. I might mess with bullet jump a little but really, I’m happy. Best not to waste barrel life.

On the topic of barrel life. Common wisdom is somewhere north of 1500 rounds but under 2000 before it’s smoked. Well that’s about a year and a half or 2 worth of life. That’s from a conventional Enfield rifled gun. I run Columbia River Arms polygonally rifled barrels which have been giving me very long barrel life and I used only HBN coated bullets for the last 1000 rounds (it’s at north of 1300 rounds now).

                     6XC Dimensions

My .243AI still runs like a laser. I only took it off because seating depth was longer than my magazine, but there’s plenty of bullet still in the case yet. I could take it another 500+ rounds if I was willing to single feed. Pushing 115’s at 3200 can’t have been gentle on it and the expectation was that by 1000 rounds it was going to look like 5 miles of rough road down the bore but it’s not. It’s smooth as glass still and makes tiny 1000 yard groups. So if we take this barrel life thing to mean the point at which the boat tail is up inside the neck of a loaded case when seated equals cooked, my .243AI will have gotten something like 2000 rounds before its death. Thanks to some combination of the HBN coating and the polygonal rifling.

Well then, I expect something like 4,000 rounds of life from my 6XC and something like 6,000 rounds from Coach’s since we’re giving his the Modern Sparts Systems Accuracy Oil treatment for its whole life. If I pull 4,000 rounds out of this barrel I’ll be surprised as hell. 3,000 rounds wouldn’t go amiss though and would be well representative of my real expectations.

How will it all turn out? Stay tuned to find out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6XC Load Data – N550, RL-23, H4350, IMR-4166

There doesn’t seem to be quite enough variety out there. 6XC can do wonders with quite a number of powders. It’s not all H4350’s world. Coach and I did some experimenting and we have some helpful results. We’ll be doing some more testing with other powders in the coming weeks.

This data came from our initial efforts at load development for my new 6XC barrel for my prone/PRS match rifle. So far it looks like we’ll be using a 39.5gn charge of H4350 to get just shy of 3,000 FPS and single digit SD’s with groups at about half an inch. It was a very tight decision as I would normally have chosen the actual winner which was N550 in a slightly lighter charge. N550 is super expensive compared to H4350 and we have several 8lbs jugs of H4350 on hand and only about 3lbs of N550.

Since we’ll be using the same load in both of our rifles (don’t forget there’s a 2nd new 6XC barrel identical to mine ready to go onto Coach’s gun), we will of course have to make sure the load performs acceptably from that rifle but so far, I haven’t made a test load I would feel bad about using in a match.

Peep out the data below and enjoy. If you have some data you’d like to share, be sure to leave it in a comment and I’ll be sure to approve it for publishing.

The 38.5 group was actually fired at the CML dot. FYI.

Chamber: 6XC (CIP)
Brass: Norma Large Primer, .013″ neck thickness, .003″ neck tension
Primer: Federal 210
Bullet: 115gn DTAC RBT HBN coated jumping .040″
Barrel: Columbia River Arms P3 (Polygonal 3 land) 25.5″
Muzzle Device: N/A

H4350 (well we did test it a good bit)
Brief: 37-40gn seems to be a decent window. Known solid performer. 3000fps is probably pushing pressures a bit for maximum brass life. Getting the case as full as possible seems to help SD’s but pressures rise rapidly at the end of the capacity limit.
38.5gn: 2929 average, 13fps SD, .75″ group
39gn: 2964 average, 15fps SD, .71″ group
39.5gn: 2977 average, 2fps SD, .33″ group

RL-23 (Reloader 23)
Brief: 37-40gn seems to be a decent window. Likes a full case. SD’s really open without a pretty full case. Meters terribly. Burns clean. We estimated we could pop 40gn in the case and get 2950fps. More testing coming but this was a very soft load pressure wise. RL-23 is super slow burning.
38gn: 2837 average, 28fps SD, .65″ group

N550
Brief: 35-38gn seems to be a decent window. Expensive powder but turned in a stunning pair of development groups at .1″ and .2″ with single digit SD’s. Pressures were mellow and it was a very quiet shooting load. People should start looking closer at N550. We started very soft
36.5gn: 2892 average, 12fps SD, .2″ group

IMR-4166
Brief: The load listed below is HOT by at least a full grain. Reduce 2 grains minimum before attempting to use. We got brass flow into the ejector hole with this load. The above noted, this is looking like a stunner. Low SD’s have been routine with this powder in every overbore case we’ve tried it in with a heavy bullet. Might be better for slightly lighter bullets than we tested.
37.5gn: 3086 average, 2fps SD, .53″ group

Freebie – ReloadingXLR – An Excel Based Reloading Spreadsheet

Enjoy this freebie from BallisticXLR. ReloadingXLR is an Excel spreadsheet (compatible with Google Sheets, OpenOffice, and most other spreadsheet applications) for metallic cartridge reloaders looking to track the load performance, reloading costs, firearm inventory, box labels and statistical data.

A number of customers have asked for this resource and since it’s such a useful tool and I’m feeling generous, I’m giving it away for free to the masses. Download by clicking the image below and enjoy!

-Meccastreisand

Here’s some screenshots of what’s included:
Individual Shot Log w/ Group Size calculator

Weapon Database:

Ammunition Box Labels

Unit Conversions

Reloading Cost Calculator

Shot String Graphs

Velocity:Temperature Multi-Session Analysis

Individual Shot Statistics

UPDATE – Modern Spartan Systems Cleaning Product Suite

Overview

Here at BallisticXLR we like to keep abreast of the movement in the firearms industry. This includes the latest in cleaning and lubrication products. Modern Spartan Systems has entered the market with cleaning and lubrication products which promise “green” technology, advanced chemistry, superior effectiveness and most interestingly, increases in muzzle velocity, reductions of group sizes and extending of barrel life. Well, we just can’t let an opportunity for a Pepsi Challenge like that go without tossing our hats in the ring.

We’ve gathered up a number of match rifles and plinking rifles. We’ve gathered defense pistols and target pistols. We’ve got trap shotguns and hunting shotguns. We’ve got high end optics, mid range optics and low end optics. We’re even bringing a cannon, a real antique Trapdoor Springfield and a new manufacture reproduction Sharps rifle in .45-70. We’ve got rimfire, centerfire and even fuse fired.

Test Protocols:

Variable Controls: We select a single load specification to complete each test with. Air temperature/humidity/pressure/wind are kept as stable as possible. Guns are not shot hot (when hot to the touch we take a break in testing to cool it off naturally)

MV Testing: We apply the entire MSS cleaning system as directed including conditioning the bore with Accuracy Oil. We compare pre-cleaning (dirty bore) velocity averages, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, minimum and maximum. Data is tracked and logged for each string as well as for each individual shot. Strings are 3-5 shots. 5 shots is the standard. 3 shots is used only where barrel heat becomes an issue during testing.

Accuracy/Precision Testing: We track group size for each string of fire during MV initial testing. After the barrels reach copper equilibrium and bench gathered data is of sufficient volume (where velocities and group sizes seem to stabilize and we have at least several 5-shot strings of velocity data post-treatment) we take the guns into competition because, hey, we are competitive shooters and that’s where the metal meets the meat so to speak. Match scores with MSS treated rifles are compared against past match performance (we have books full of our match scores).

Barrel Life: We have obtained 2 identical Columbia River Arms barrels chambered in 6mm XC. Both are chambered with the same reamer on the same lathe by the same gunsmith in the same week. Extra care was used in selecting a custom reamer and machinist gunsmith capable of the required precision to minimize tolerances like run-out. Both barrels are being put into existing match rifles. Both rifles will shoot the same load spec (this makes load development unnecessarily tricky but we’ll deal with it). Loads will use the same lot of brass/powder/primers/bullets and both will used only HBN coated DTAC bullets from David Tubb. One barrel will be treated with MSS’s system from the beginning, the other will not. After every 200 rounds we’ll re-clean & re-treat the treated barrel. On the control barrel we’ll clean every 200 rounds with Wipe-Out (which we prefer over Hoppe’s #9 & Sweet’s 7.62). We’ll track the barrel life via match scores, throat erosion pace, velocity retention and group size until we have a clear winner. We estimate it will take 1000 rounds to get to a usefully good answer.

Raw Data By Shot String Average:

6mm XC

7mm BR

6.5×55 Swede

.223 Remington

Raw Data Shot-By-Shot

Initial Results

What we see with the .223; which has the most shots through it since treatment, we see that MV’s have stabilized. Group size average during treatment was over 1 inch. After treatment group size for a 10-shot string was .7 inch. SD’s were dropped roughly in half. Minimum string velocity (a component of velocity extreme spread) increased substantially without a sympathetic change in maximum string velocity as well. A gun/load combination that was getting on my nerves is now showing signs of being a potential sweetheart.

What we see with the 7mm BR, the 6mm XC and the 6.5×55 Swede so far is very similar to what we saw during the early phases with the .223. A lot of volatility during the treatment phase followed by what appears to be (NOTE: APPEARS TO BE, these are early results, too early for real conclusions) some stabilization. What we have not seen are dramatic, sticky (meaning that the effect persists) increases in MV. If anything what we see are slight reductions in peak velocity and slight increases in minimum velocity. That’s an increase of consistency which any shooter would gladly take over any token velocity increase.

As you move up and to the right you’ll see progression. Groups at bottom and left are at the beginning of treatment. Top and right are end of treatment. L-.223,M-6XC,R-7mmBR

What we did see pretty universally (only the 7mm BR didn’t improve) is a reduction in group size. Could this be a rebuke of our blanket advice to avoid unnecessarily cleaning a rifle? Maybe. It could also be due to more consistent friction leading to more consistent harmonics. It could be the stars aligning. Part of that advice to clean as infrequently as possible is economics based. It takes a good number of shots (so far it’s looking like at least 5-10 and as much as 40+ in some cases) for a barrel to get to copper fouling equilibrium. Part of it is based on the notion that most rifle barrel wear out in the real world of sport shooters comes from overly aggressive and overly frequent cleaning. We do both. Our metallic silhouette rifles mostly get cleaned after every 100-200 rounds (except my red gun). Our PRS/prone guns historically get cleaned almost never… like every 400 rounds or so.

What do you think we’ll see as final results? Comment below!

Modern Spartan Systems – Long Term Testing Update – The Snake Gun

Numbers don’t lie so if you want to see those numbers, scroll down and check ’em out.

Definitely seeing a velocity boost evolving during the treatment phase. Looks like SD’s are growing but we won’t know the long term trends on this for another week as there are more shots to fire. Treatment phase is 5 sets of 5 shot groups. Between each group we apply a very light coat of MSS Accuracy Oil down the bore on a patch wrapped around a brush. That pulls the carbon out pretty well and puts another layer of their crazy effective lubricating oil down the bore.

This test data shows 50 rounds of history gathered during bench-rested zero-checking, load development and grouping data collected over the last year with me not cleaning the bore at all on my heavily customized, Columbia River Arms barreled Mossberg MVP .223 followed by another 25 rounds of very recent history from last weekend’s testing with MSS’s cleaning system being used.

Avoiding much discussion of velocities we can look at group sizes. This rifle with this load has been a pretty consistent 1-1.5MOA rifle. It doesn’t like this load, never has, and that has annoyed me because it should be a killer load. During the testing and doing the Accuracy Oil re-application treatments I saw very consistently that the first shot was wild, then the 2nd-5th shots gradually closed in on each other finally ending with shots 4-5 stacking on top of each other. Overall group sizes started at 1.2MOA and by the end of the initial Accuracy Oil treatment plan had reduced to a very nice group under .7MOA with the last 3 shots touching and the first 2 just slightly off that cluster (could have been shooter error but I doubt it). This behavior was consistent from the first string to the 5th string. I have not cleaned the barrel after shooting. I did run a patch down the bore with Accuracy Oil on it though. Before shooting next time we’ll run a few dry patches down the pipe to make sure it’s completely dry and then we’ll see what happens.

Each string below represents a 5-shot set with statistics reported for the string. This load has slowly evolved over the last couple years with a little OAL and a little powder being added between string 1 and string 9. I stopped messing with the load spec after string 9 because I just wasn’t shooting the gun. Now I’m sticking with that practice while we finish up our testing. 75 rounds in to the testing we’re seeing definitely trend line activity but we’ll save the analysis and conclusion drawing until we have more data.

So what do you think? Will this trend continue? Will it even out? Will it reverse? We shall see.

Note: This is not one of my match loads. This is a load I never shoot in competition because it’s not been consistent enough. I’ve wanted to do a little more work on it because it’s a really mild load with long legs. I chose this load because it’s not a one-holer out of the gate so we have some room to see if MSS’s claims are worth taking seriously. So far, they’re at least intriguing.

Stay tuned!

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